University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Computer Laboratory Digital Technology Group (DTG) Meetings > (Research) Pollution Monitoring in the Streets of Cambridge / (Research)An Application-Oriented Node Placement for Wireless Sensor Networks

(Research) Pollution Monitoring in the Streets of Cambridge / (Research)An Application-Oriented Node Placement for Wireless Sensor Networks

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Pollution Monitoring in the Streets of Cambridge, Alastair Beresford

Pollution levels in Cambridge are primarily monitored by a handful of large sensors installed at fixed locations across the city. This talk will describe work undertaken as part of the MESSAGE project to explore the potential of mobile sensing, with a focus on the construction, use and some early results from the deployment of small mobile pollution sensors. The devices are sufficiently portable that they can be comfortably carried by pedestrians, cyclists and car drivers, providing new insight into the spatio-temporal variability in pollution levels. This is a repeat of a talk given by Rod Jones and Alastair Beresford in November at the Christs’ College Transport Event.

An Application-Oriented Node Placement for Wireless Sensor Networks, Ruoshui Lui

Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) provide a promising infrastructure for gathering information about parameters of the physical world in various civilian applications, such as building automation, environmental monitoring, industrial control, etc. Sensor node placement is the fundamental factor in determining the coverage, connectivity, cost and lifetime of the networks. In this talk, the problem of optimal placement of relay nodes in the actual confined areas, e.g., underground railway tunnel, is tackled from a different perspective. We model the problem using the constraints which are relatively close to the actual deployment, and we aim to develop a practical planning tool for WSNs.

This talk is part of the Computer Laboratory Digital Technology Group (DTG) Meetings series.

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