University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Adrian Seminars in Neuroscience > Decoding the population activity of grid cells for spatial localization and goal-directed navigation

Decoding the population activity of grid cells for spatial localization and goal-directed navigation

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Mammalian grid cells discharge when an animal crosses the points of an imaginary hexagonal grid tessellating the environment. In this talk, I will show how animals can use this code by reading out the grid-cell population activity across multiple spatial scales. The theory explains key experimental results, makes testable predictions for future physiological and behavioral studies, and provides a mathematical foundation for the concept of a “neural metric” for space. For goal-directed navigation, the proposed allocentric grid-cell representation can be readily transformed into the egocentric goal coordinates needed for planning movements. These results show that the grid-cell code provides a powerful and highly flexible neural substrate for spatial cognition.

This talk is part of the Adrian Seminars in Neuroscience series.

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