University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > British Antarctic Survey > Indicating natural and anthropogenic changes in marine ecosystems: Field studies with seabirds in the North Atlantic

Indicating natural and anthropogenic changes in marine ecosystems: Field studies with seabirds in the North Atlantic

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Studies on distribution, abundance and behaviour of seabirds can provide valuable information on marine ecosystems. Studies executed over longer time scales are of particular value as they may be able to unravel changes in the sea and/or the coastal zone.

In this talk, studies on two groups of seabirds are presented that demonstrate such changes. Northern Gannets were investigated in one of the largest colonies in the world in eastern Canada and in a small colony in the southern North Sea. Lesser Black-backed and Herring Gulls were studied in several breeding colonies and on their foraging grounds in the southern North Sea.

Data were collected by various classic and modern field techniques and provide information on population trends, distribution, diets and feedings habitats of both gannets and gulls. They show to what extent natural (fish stocks, hydrography) and anthropogenic (fisheries, agriculture, wind farms) factors are affecting these seabirds.

This talk is part of the British Antarctic Survey series.

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