University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > DAMTP Astro Mondays > Hydrodynamical simulations of protoplanetary disks including irradiation of stellar photons. I. Resolution study for vertical shear instability

Hydrodynamical simulations of protoplanetary disks including irradiation of stellar photons. I. Resolution study for vertical shear instability

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  • UserLizxandra Flores-Rivera - MPIA, Heidelberg
  • ClockMonday 15 February 2021, 14:00-15:00
  • HouseOnline.

If you have a question about this talk, please contact Cleo Loi.

In recent years hydrodynamical (HD) models have become important to describe the gas kinematics in protoplanetary disks, especially in combination with models of photoevaporation and/or magnetically driven winds. Our aim is to investigate how vertical shear instability (VSI) could influence the thermally driven winds on the surface of protoplanetary disks. In this first part of the project, we focus on diagnosing the conditions of the VSI at the highest numerical resolution ever recorded, and suggest at what resolution per scale height we obtain convergence. At the same time, we want to investigate the vertical extent of VSI activity. Finally, we determine the regions where extreme UV (EUV), far-UV (FUV), and X-ray photons are dominant in the disk. We perform global HD simulations using the PLUTO code. We adopt a global isothermal accretion disk setup, 2.5D (2 dimensions, 3 components) which covers a radial domain from 0.5 to 5.0 and an approximately full meridional extension. Our simulation runs cover a resolution from 12 to 203 cells per scale height. The results that I will be showing in this talk, highlight the importance of combining photoevaporation processes in the future high-resolution studies of turbulence and accretion processes in disks.

This talk is part of the DAMTP Astro Mondays series.

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