University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > DAMTP Astrophysics Seminar > Do in situ spacecraft observations contain signatures of intermittent solar wind acceleration from the Corona?

Do in situ spacecraft observations contain signatures of intermittent solar wind acceleration from the Corona?

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If you have a question about this talk, please contact Dr William B├ęthune.

Two exciting new space missions approaching the Sun closer than ever will launch in the next future, the NASA -Parker Solar Probe (PSP, 2018) and ESA -Solar Orbiter (SO, 2020). These missions will provide a novel vision of the Sun environment, enabling a direct link between distant Solar observations and in situ measurements of the solar wind, the hot, supersonic outflow that originates from the expansion of the Corona and fills in the solar system, carrying detailed information about the composition and thermodynamic state of the plasma in the Solar atmosphere. In view of these forthcoming explorations, we have performed a re-analysis of what today is still our closest approach to the Sun, the Helios mission that reached the orbit of Mercury (0.3AU). The Helios dataset, although 40-year old, is still not fully exploited and is ideally suited for the modelling of the PSP and SO missions and science predictions. I will discuss some new signatures of jet-like velocity shears observed in the solar wind close to the Sun, possibly remnant of intermittent processes occurring in the Corona and Chromosphere and supporting the idea that the fast solar wind acceleration region from coronal holes may be characterised by significant shears and be less homogeneous than we think today.

This talk is part of the DAMTP Astrophysics Seminar series.

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