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Experimental Continuation of Nonlinear Structures

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In order to fully exploit the potential of nonlinear structures in engineering applications, we must not only develop appropriate design and analysis techniques, but also experimental methods to validate their performance. Existing experimental methods are limited in the structural behaviour they can measure, and cannot capture nonlinear phenomena such snapback, or follow unstable equilibrium branches. A quasi-static experimental continuation method has been developed, which expands our ability to experimentally measure unstable equilibria in nonlinear structures. This talk will introduce the theoretical background to the experimental continuation method, highlighting parallels with numerical continuation methods, and present initial experimental results for a shallow arch test case.

About the Speaker: Mark Schenk is a Lecturer in Aerospace Engineering at the University of Bristol, and works within the Bristol Composites Institute (ACCIS). He works on deployable and morphing structures, with a current focus on developing experimental methods for nonlinear structures. Previously, he worked as Research Associate in deployable structures at the Surrey Space Centre, and the Advanced Structures Group at the Cambridge University Engineering Department. His PhD was on engineering origami structures under supervision of Professor Simon Guest at Cambridge University, and his BSc/MSc degrees are from Delft University of Technology.

This talk is part of the Engineering Department Structures Research Seminars series.

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