University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Computer Laboratory Digital Technology Group (DTG) Meetings > (Research) A Limited-Data Model Of Building Energy Consumption / (Research) Relay Node Placement for Wireless Sensor Networks Deployed in Tunnels

(Research) A Limited-Data Model Of Building Energy Consumption / (Research) Relay Node Placement for Wireless Sensor Networks Deployed in Tunnels

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A Limited-Data Model Of Building Energy Consumption: Simon Hay

We present a model targeted at practical, wide-scale deployment which produces an ongoing breakdown of building energy consumption. We argue that wide-scale deployment is practical due to its reliance only on commonly available sensor information and crowd-sourced inventory data. The results for our own building over the previous 10 months show many of the trends seen in the building’s true, metered energy consumption and we find our model predicts long term averages within 10% of the true value in some scenarios. We further use our model to estimate the potential impact of some energy saving scenarios.

Relay Node Placement for Wireless Sensor Networks Deployed in Tunnels, Ruoshiu Liu

Node placement plays a significant role in the effective and successful deployment of Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs), i.e., meeting design goals such as cost effectiveness, coverage, connectivity, lifetime and data latency. In this talk, we propose a new strategy to assist in the placement of Relay Nodes (RNs) for a WSN monitoring underground tunnel infrastructure. By applying for the first time an accurate empirical mean path loss propagation model along with a well fitted fading distribution model specifically defined for the tunnel environment, we address the RN placement problem with guaranteed levels of radio link performance. The implementation of the proposed scheme is evaluated by simulation, and it lays the foundations for further work in WSN planning for underground tunnel applications.

This talk is part of the Computer Laboratory Digital Technology Group (DTG) Meetings series.

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