University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Centre for Atmospheric Science seminars, Chemistry Dept. > The role of chemistry and oxidants on the forcing from vegetation emissions and the next steps for understanding the atmospheric composition changes and forcing from widespread tree planting

The role of chemistry and oxidants on the forcing from vegetation emissions and the next steps for understanding the atmospheric composition changes and forcing from widespread tree planting

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Emissions of BVO Cs affect climate via the formation of organic aerosols and their influence on cloud properties, and via atmospheric oxidation changes influencing the greenhouse gases ozone and methane. BVO Cs also exhibit dependence on climate (leading to a feedback), and land use change (including afforestation/reforestation as a CO2 removal strategy). Despite recent scientific advances, there remains considerable uncertainty between model simulations in the net impact BVO Cs have on climate. One contributor to this uncertainty is the description of BVOC chemistry, hitherto minimally assessed in a climate context. To quantify the influence of chemistry, the climate response to a doubling of BVOC emissions with the Strat-Trop and CRI -Strat 2 chemical mechanisms is compared. This comparison illustrates the significant influence of chemistry, via oxidant concentrations, on gas and aerosol responses to BVOC emission changes and the more complex pathways by which BVO Cs influence climate than are currently recognised.

I will also discuss more recent work on developing an alternative set of UKESM /iBVOC emission factors for isoprene and monoterpene. This aims to fix an oversimplification in the current approach and will have implications for the simulation of future changes in BVOC emissions.

Finally, I will present current and planned work looking at future BVOC emissions changes associated with a deforestation scenario (ssp370) and a scenario considering widescale, but plausible, re/afforestation, including experiments to assess the role of background climate on the impact of BVOC emission changes.

This talk is part of the Centre for Atmospheric Science seminars, Chemistry Dept. series.

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