University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > C.U. Ethics in Mathematics Society (CUEiMS) > Ethics for the working mathematician, lecture 4: Fairness and impartiality in algorithms and AI.

Ethics for the working mathematician, lecture 4: Fairness and impartiality in algorithms and AI.

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Algorithms run the world, and mathematicians are designing them. Algorithms decide what people read, what they buy, and when then can get a loan. We often design these systems to remove human subjectivity from decision making processes and to make them impartial, as is being done with predictive policing algorithms and prison sentencing algorithms. But how impartial, or fair, can a system designed by humans ever be? Moreover, the internet and big data have given rise to massive new potential, from targeted political advertising as done by Cambridge Analytica, to AI technology such as deepfake videos and self-driving cars. Our “solutions” in these instances can bring about a whole new set of problems.

This talk is part of the C.U. Ethics in Mathematics Society (CUEiMS) series.

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