University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Isaac Newton Institute Seminar Series > Fibonacci phyllotaxis in plants and algae, a biological convergence with a physical origin

Fibonacci phyllotaxis in plants and algae, a biological convergence with a physical origin

Add to your list(s) Download to your calendar using vCal

If you have a question about this talk, please contact info@newton.ac.uk.

GFSW01 - Form and deformation in solid and fluid mechanics

Plants and brown algae do not belong to the same lineage. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrates that the divergence between these two clades occurred approximately 1800 million years ago. Their most recent common ancestors were unicellular eukaryotic organisms and the transition to multi-cellularity occurred independently in the two lineages. It is therefore remarkable that similar global morphologies can be observed in both clades. The role of physical laws and evolution in these convergences will be discussed using the Fibonacci spiral organization as a test case. 

This talk is part of the Isaac Newton Institute Seminar Series series.

Tell a friend about this talk:

This talk is included in these lists:

Note that ex-directory lists are not shown.

 

© 2006-2017 Talks.cam, University of Cambridge. Contact Us | Help and Documentation | Privacy and Publicity