University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > CQIF Seminar > Voyage to Alpha Centauri: degradation, creation and detection of cavity mode entanglement due to motion.

Voyage to Alpha Centauri: degradation, creation and detection of cavity mode entanglement due to motion.

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We propose a scheme to investigate how motion through spacetime affects entangle- ment. We find and compute the entanglement degradation analytically for a Dirichlet scalar field in a Minkowski cavity for trajectories grafted from inertial and uniformly accelerated segments of small acceleration, giving explicit results for sample travel scenarios. Degradation of observable magnitude occurs for massless transverse quanta of optical wavelength at Earth gravity acceleration and for kaon mass quanta already at microgravity acceleration. We outline a space-based experiment for observing the effect and its gravitational counterpart. We also find that entanglement between cavity modes can be created where none was present and, for a particular trajectory and the two lowest modes, (arbitrarily) high two mode squeezing can be produced (Available as [1, 2, 3, 4]).

References:

[1] D. E. Bruschi, J. Louko and I. Fuentes: Voyage to Alpha Centauri: Entanglement degradation of cavity modes due to motion, 2011, Phys. Rev. D 85 , 061701® (2012).

[2] N. Friis, A. Lee, D. E. Bruschi, J. Louko: Kinematic entanglement degradation of fermionic cavity modes, 2011, Phys. Rev. D 85 , 025012 (2012)

[3] D. E. Bruschi, A. Dragan, A. R. Lee, I. Fuentes and J. Louko: Motion-generated entanglement resonance, 2012, e-Print:1201.0663

[4] N. Friis, D. E. Bruschi, J. Louko and I. Fuentes: Motion generates entanglement 2012, e-Print:1201.0663 to appear in Phys. Rev. D®

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