University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Arts, Culture and Education > Capturing complexity: An interdisciplinary review of movement capture technologies in the arts, humanities, and social sciences

Capturing complexity: An interdisciplinary review of movement capture technologies in the arts, humanities, and social sciences

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If you have a question about this talk, please contact Ewa Illakowicz.

Please contact Pam Burnard (pab61@cam.ac.uk) if you are planning to attend!

ABSTRACT : How to capture the ephemeral movement of the body has drawn increased methodological interest from scholars and practitioners working across the arts, humanities and social sciences. Promising interdisciplinary collaborations are emerging through the shared use of technologies including dance notation and motion capture. The increased affordability of movement capture technologies including Microsoft Kinect and Nintendo Wii are expanding possibilities for arts and social science research. But education research has tended to overlook body movement as teaching and learning can be often conceptualised through cerebral, optic, and linguistic frames of reference. In this talk, I will thematically analyse interdisciplinary movement capture collaborations and discuss opportunities for education research.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER : Dr. Denmead is a Research Assistant in the School of Media at the University of Lincoln. He received his PhD in Education from the University of Cambridge. His doctoral research examined creative, community-based collaborations between artists and families. Prior to graduate school, Denmead was the founding executive director of New Urban Arts, a non-profit organisation founded in 1997 to build a vital learning community in a storefront studio that empowers young people to develop lifelong creative practices. First Lady Michelle Obama recognised New Urban Arts as one of the premiere arts and youth development programs in the United States during a 2008 ceremony at The White House.

This talk is part of the Arts, Culture and Education series.

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