University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Departmental Seminars in History and Philosophy of Science > Humility in population health science: lessons for fostering an elder-supportive 'culture of health' after the pandemic

Humility in population health science: lessons for fostering an elder-supportive 'culture of health' after the pandemic

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  • UserSean Valles (Michigan State University) World_link
  • ClockThursday 20 May 2021, 15:30-17:00
  • HouseZoom.

If you have a question about this talk, please contact Helen Curry.

One component of the increasingly popular ‘population health science’ framework is a conviction that public health requires health-conducive policies and social practices across society, which together constitute a ‘culture of health’: living wages, anti-racist public education and legal reforms, community-run health clinics, etc. One challenge for such efforts is that most communities are ill-designed for supporting elders’ well-being: substandard eldercare facilities, neighbourhoods not designed for people with vision or mobility impairments, etc. I argue that one important piece of this public health effort is the humility that will need to be cultivated alongside other more concrete cultural resources. In particular, I will draw out a lesson from population health science theory: that humility is a vital part of an effort to create a culture of health in any community, a culture that fully includes elders’ well-being. This includes humility in the relations between academic disciplines, between sectors of society, and between individual members of society.

This talk is part of the Departmental Seminars in History and Philosophy of Science series.

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