University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Plant Sciences Departmental Seminars > Plant puzzle cell shape is an adaptation to a developmental constraint based on mechanical stress and isotropic growth

Plant puzzle cell shape is an adaptation to a developmental constraint based on mechanical stress and isotropic growth

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Shape in an organism is often thought to be closely related to its function. The puzzle-shaped epidermal cells that appear in the epidermis of many plants are a striking example of a complex cell shape, however their functional benefit to the plant has remained elusive. We propose that the creation of these complex shapes is an effective strategy to reduce mechanical stress in the cell wall. Although the formation of these shapes requires highly anisotropic and non-uniform growth at the sub-cellular level, it appears to be triggered by isotropic growth at the organ level. A re-analysis of recently published data suggests that this constraint is conserved among the land plants.

This talk is part of the Plant Sciences Departmental Seminars series.

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