University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Engineering Department Structures Research Seminars > The development of design standards for the construction sector: Why do they matter and why should you care about them?

The development of design standards for the construction sector: Why do they matter and why should you care about them?

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If you have a question about this talk, please contact Karen Mitchell.

Steve Denton is WSP ’s Head of Civil, Bridge and Ground Engineering and chairs their Technical Leadership Group. His interests and experience span many facets of engineering and strategic consultancy, research and construction. In addition to his business and project leadership responsibilities, Steve retains a high degree of technical involvement in projects. Steve is experienced in the design, assessment and strengthening of bridges and structures. He has particular expertise in the development and drafting of Standards, research and development in numerous fields of structural engineering, and the development of refined analysis and assessment techniques.

Steve is Chair of CEN /TC 250, the international committee with overall responsibility for the Structural Eurocodes. These Standards are used by around 500 000 engineers across Europe for structural and geotechnical design, as well as in many other countries around the world. In this role, Steve is currently leading one the largest ever funded standardisation development projects in Europe to create the second generation of the Eurocodes.

Steve graduated from Cambridge University in 1992, and between 1996 and 1999 he held a Junior Research Fellowship at the University. He is currently a Visiting Professor at the University of Bath and is a Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering.

This talk is part of the Engineering Department Structures Research Seminars series.

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