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Towards earlier diagnosis for cancer of the oesophagus

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If you have a question about this talk, please contact Benjamin Beresford-Jones.

Professor Rebecca Fitzgerald will join us to discuss the challenges of developing methods of molecular diagnoses of cancer, and the difficulties in implementing these as new test procedures through the NHS . Professor Fitzgerald is a tenured Programme Leader at the MRC Cancer Unit, working to improve methods for early detection of oesophageal cancer through better understanding of its molecular pathogenesis. With oesophageal adenocarcinoma becoming the most prevalent form of oesophageal cancer in the western world, Professor Fitzgerald will be discussing how we can use specific markers to tailor treatments to the patient and thereby improve patient outcomes and prognoses.

About the speaker: Professor Fitzgerald is a leading researcher in the field of oesophageal cancer, having developed the Cytosponge, a new technique for diagnosing Barrett’s oesophagus. She was awarded the prestigious Westminster Medal and Prize for her first proof-of-concept work on the Cytosponge and associated assays for diagnosing Barrett’s oesophagus in 2004. Since then she has received an NHS Innovation prize, the BMJ Gastro team of the year award, the Lister Prize Fellowship, and an NIHR Research Professorship to facilitate translational research for patient benefit. Professor Fitzgerald is committed to bringing research advances into clinical practice and inspiring other researchers to do likewise.

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This talk is part of the SciSoc – Cambridge University Scientific Society series.

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