University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > SciSoc – Cambridge University Scientific Society > SCISOC TALK - 103 years of Crystallography: what has it taught us and where will lead us?

SCISOC TALK - 103 years of Crystallography: what has it taught us and where will lead us?

Add to your list(s) Download to your calendar using vCal

If you have a question about this talk, please contact Benjamin Beresford-Jones.

X-Ray crystallography was born in 1912 with the determination of the 3D structure of sodium chloride. Since then, it has enabled the elucidation of a huge range of structures in biology, physics, chemistry, engineering and earth sciences. Using crystallography, we can unravel the shapes of biomolecules in our bodies that are targets for drugs against disease, and thus identify new treatments. Elspeth Garman specializes in finding the three-dimensional shapes of medically important biological molecules, allowing disease pathways to be understood at the molecular level. She will be exploring what is currently achievable and what may be possible in the future.

Elspeth Garman is Professor of Molecular Biophysics at Oxford University. Her main research interests are in improving methods for finding the three-dimensional shapes of medically important biological molecules so that larger and more complicated structures can be determined. She is a well known communicator of science, has been interviewed on the Radio 4 program ‘The Life Scientific’ and is the recipient of the 2016 American Crystallographic Association’s Fankuchen Prize, awarded in recognition of her original contributions to scientific research and her worldwide postgraduate teaching.

Free for members, £3 for non-members. Membership can be purchased on the door for £12.

This talk is part of the SciSoc – Cambridge University Scientific Society series.

Tell a friend about this talk:

This talk is included in these lists:

Note that ex-directory lists are not shown.

 

© 2006-2019 Talks.cam, University of Cambridge. Contact Us | Help and Documentation | Privacy and Publicity