University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > BSS Formal Seminars > Building from bottom up: Fabrication of novel materials using designer self-assembling peptides

Building from bottom up: Fabrication of novel materials using designer self-assembling peptides

Add to your list(s) Download to your calendar using vCal

If you have a question about this talk, please contact Dr Kalin Dragnevski.

Materials science has generally been associated with metallurgy, alloy, ceramics, composites, polymer science, fiber spinning, coating, thin film, industrial surfactants and block copolymer development. That is about to change. Materials science will also expand to discovery and fabrication of biological and molecular materials with diverse structures, functionalities and utilities. The advent of nanobiotechnology and nanotechnology accelerated this trend. Similar as construction of an intricate architectural structure, diverse and numerous structural motifs are used to assemble a sophisticated complex. Nature has selected, produced and evolved numerous molecular architectural motifs over billions of years for particular functions. These molecular motifs can now be used to build materials from the bottom up. Materials science will begin to harness nature’s enormous power to benefit other disciplines and society.

Zhang, S. (2001) Molecular self-assembly. Encyclopedia of Materials: Science & Technology, Elsevier Science, Oxford, UK pp.5822-5829.

Zhang, S. (2002) Emerging biological materials through molecular self-assembly Biotechnology Advances 20, 321-339.

Zhang, S. (2003) Fabrication of novel materials through molecular self-assembly. Nature Biotechnology 21, 1171-1178.

Zhao, X. & Zhang, S. (2006) Molecular designer self-assembling peptides. Royal Society of Chemistry 35, 1105-1110.

This talk is part of the BSS Formal Seminars series.

Tell a friend about this talk:

This talk is included in these lists:

Note that ex-directory lists are not shown.

 

© 2006-2019 Talks.cam, University of Cambridge. Contact Us | Help and Documentation | Privacy and Publicity