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(Skills) How -not- to review a paper / (Research) Giving off the Right Signals!

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Skills: How not to review a paper, Ioannis Chatzigeorgiou

The objective of this talk is to demonstrate that writing a good review is often more challenging than writing a good paper. We provide a few tips on how to review a paper and many examples of poor quality reviews based on which we conclude that rejections and occasionally acceptances, should not always be taken seriously.

Research: Giving off the Right Signals!, Simon Fothergill

I will present my recent research in the context of my proposed thesis. It will contain material in practice for my keynote session presentation at the Jesus College Graduate Conference at 5pm on Friday 2nd May.

Capturing the movements of a person whilst they are performing a physical task can provide signals from which it may be possible to infer the quality of the technique used during the performance. A value or description of this quality would allow applications to coach sports or surgical technique or help avoid injury.

Rather than using expensive or unavailable biomechanical models to translate the movements into a more meaningful format, a more abstract model is learnt from expertly labeled examples of athletes’ performing indoor rowing. The judgment of the quality of individual aspects of the technique is compared with the expert labeling for a number of populations of strokes.

This talk is part of the Computer Laboratory Digital Technology Group (DTG) Meetings series.

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