University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Gordon Lab Seminar Series > Genetically Modified Mechanostats: Implications for Skeletal Competence Bone Remodelling, Repair and Replacement?

Genetically Modified Mechanostats: Implications for Skeletal Competence Bone Remodelling, Repair and Replacement?

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The skeleton often perceived as an inert scaffold supporting the body is in fact a dynamic feat of structural engineering optimising structure for function and responding to changes in mechanical demands. The architecture of the bones of the skeleton is a consequence of both the genetic template and adaptation to superimposed mechanobiological modification. Thus, in a given genetically diverse population, the morphology of the skeleton will also show an inherent variation in architecture. Changes in functional activity, age and predisposition to hormonal changes can all modify the morphology and mechanical competence of the skeleton. The response of the skeleton to changes in mechanical demand has been shown to act as a feedback control system regulated by strain, and mediated through signalling of the bone cell populations. Functional adaptation of the skeleton has traditionally been presented as a common pathway in response to changes in mechanical environment. Recently, however, the genetically related variance in bone material properties, structural architecture and degree of functional adaptation has added a new complexity to understanding the mechanobiology of the skeleton and its relation to bone repair, implant integration and degenerative conditions such as osteoporosis and osteoarthritis.

This talk is part of the Gordon Lab Seminar Series series.

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