University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Pedagogy, Language, Arts & Culture in Education (PLACE) Group Seminars > The roles of arts therapies in secure settings with specific examples from recent music therapy research studies in prisons and high secure forensic settings in China and Europe

The roles of arts therapies in secure settings with specific examples from recent music therapy research studies in prisons and high secure forensic settings in China and Europe

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This talk will provide an overview of some theories behind arts therapies in the field of criminology and their application in different settings including in high secure forensic settings and prisons, both in the UK and elsewhere. Examples will be given from three recent music therapy research studies and also from the speaker’s own practice. Audio and video material will illustrate different approaches in music therapy specifically, including live interactive improvisation, and song writing. Drawing upon psychoanalytic theory and later modern theories as found in_ Cognitive Analytic Therapy_ (Compton-Dickinson 2013), Odell-Miller will provide a landscape of theory practice and research, and invite discussion later. The talk will also draw upon her jointly edited book Forensic Music Therapy (Compton-Dickinson, Odell-Miller and Adlam (2013), London: Jessica Kingsley.

Dr Helen Odell-Miller is a Professor of Music Therapy at Anglia Ruskin University Cambridge and Director of The Music for Health Centre there. For many years she has advised the government on music therapy and arts therapy practice and will be providing evidence at a House of Lords debate on music for health and music therapy in February 2015. She is a music therapist, researcher, manager and academic and for many years worked in the NHS developing music therapy and other arts therapies services, where she holds an honorary contract in the local mental health trust in Cambridge.

This talk is part of the Pedagogy, Language, Arts & Culture in Education (PLACE) Group Seminars series.

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