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Young Children’s development of a sense of learning agency through their transition between Kindergarten and First grade in Chile

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Young children’s agency in their learning and development has been of recent interest to educational research, policy and practice. Research in early childhood education has focused on early transitions, children’s perspectives, self-regulated learning and metacognitive development, amongst others, seeking to understand children’s participation in their learning experiences. However, this work does not fully address the relationship between learning and development, nor has it begun to explore the influence of early transition experiences on the development of children’s learning agency from the child’s perspective. My study aims to contribute towards this gap through participatory research with young children as informants of their learning experiences through their transition from kindergarten to first grade. The study took place in a State school in Santiago, Chile, with 16 young children aged 5½ to 6½ years. A cultural historical model is employed to explore children’s perspectives. By employing visual participatory methods such as photograph interview tasks (book-making and poster-making), and classroom video recordings, my work brings together psychological, educational and sociological perspectives to understand the development of children’s sense of learning agency in an educational context.

This talk is part of the FERSA Lunchtime Sessions series.

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