University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Biophysical Seminars > Polymers through protein pores: single-molecule experiments with nucleic acids, polypeptides and polysaccharides

Polymers through protein pores: single-molecule experiments with nucleic acids, polypeptides and polysaccharides

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When polymers move from one cellular compartment to another, they pass through protein pores. Nucleic acids, polypeptides and polysaccharides are all transported in this way, stimulating questions about the nature of the transported polymer (diameter, stiffness, branching, charge, charge distribution), the driving force (DV, DpH, refolding, binding) and how that driving force is coupled (direct coupling v diffusion/ ratchet). We have been investigating all three classes of biopolymer by current recording through individual transmembrane pores. We have not only made interesting fundamental discoveries about the translocation processes, but also found useful applications of our work, for example in nucleic acid sequencing and the discovery of antibacterial agents.

This talk is part of the Biophysical Seminars series.

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