University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Educational Leadership, Policy, Evaluation and Change (ELPEC) Academic Group > ELPEC Lunchtime Seminar: Understanding Teacher Retention

ELPEC Lunchtime Seminar: Understanding Teacher Retention

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In this presentation Rebecca Allen will use the School Workforce Census to explore the decisions of teachers to moves schools, gain promotion or to leave the profession altogether. Differences in employment outcomes for teachers vary systematically by the teacher’s own characteristics, by the nature of the school and by local labour market conditions. She will talk about the possibilities of using this type of analysis to improve decisions we make about where to train teachers, how much to pay them and how to support career breaks and flexible working patterns.

Rebecca Allen is Director of Education Datalab, on leave from her academic position as Reader in Economics of Education at UCL Institute of Education. She is an expert in the analysis of large scale administrative and survey datasets, including the National Pupil Database and School Workforce Census. Her research interests include school accountability, measuring performance, pupil admissions and teacher labour markets. She has experience of leading and delivering large research projects that have been funded by Government, research councils, educational foundations and charities. Rebecca is a member of the Ofqual Standards Advisory Group, co-organiser of the PLASC /NPD User Group, a member of the researchED Advisory Panel, the Sutton Trust Research Board, the ARK Mathematics Mastery Development Board and Teach First Impact Advisory Group.

This talk is part of the Educational Leadership, Policy, Evaluation and Change (ELPEC) Academic Group series.

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