University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Physical Chemistry Research Interest Group > Shedding new light on photochemistry in nature: from biological motifs to photoactive protein chromophores

Shedding new light on photochemistry in nature: from biological motifs to photoactive protein chromophores

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Light-induced processes processes are ubiquitous in nature, for example in the harvesting of solar energy. Isolated biological chromophores provide ideal laboratories for studying the key elementary processes following light-absorption, free from the complications of interactions with aqueous or protein environments. In this seminar, I will discuss how femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy is a valuable tool for probing the electronic structure and electronic and molecular dynamics of biological motifs and chromophores in the gas-phase. This will be followed by a discussion of our recent work investigating the remarkable photostability of some of nature’s key molecular motifs (aniline and pyrrole) and the competition between ultrafast non-radiative decay and fluorescence in the chromophore of the green fluorescent protein, one of the most widely used fluorescent proteins in biological imaging.

This talk is part of the Physical Chemistry Research Interest Group series.

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