University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Centre for Atmospheric Science seminars, Chemistry Dept. > Vortex splitting in the stratosphere by sub planetary-scale cyclogenesis in the troposphere, and some other thoughts about the dynamics of stratospheric sudden warmings

Vortex splitting in the stratosphere by sub planetary-scale cyclogenesis in the troposphere, and some other thoughts about the dynamics of stratospheric sudden warmings

Add to your list(s) Download to your calendar using vCal

If you have a question about this talk, please contact Paul Griffiths.

One of the most rapid and dramatic dynamical events occurring in the stratosphere is the splitting of the polar vortex, a structure that dominates the mid winter circulation. When the vortex splits, chemical species, such as ozone, are transported over great distance from the equator to the pole and mixed together. The phenomenon has intrigued dynamical meteorologists for some time, and ideas have been put forward to explain it, typically involving the generation and upward propagation of so-called planetary waves from the troposphere. I propose something different: that sub-planetary scale cyclones – weather systems, the effects of which are normally confined to the troposphere – can in fact do the job under particular conditions. I contrast the dynamical behaviour with other classes of so-called stratospheric sudden warmings, and comment on matters of atmospheric predictability at the time of such events.

This talk is part of the Centre for Atmospheric Science seminars, Chemistry Dept. series.

Tell a friend about this talk:

This talk is included in these lists:

Note that ex-directory lists are not shown.

 

© 2006-2019 Talks.cam, University of Cambridge. Contact Us | Help and Documentation | Privacy and Publicity