University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Social Psychology Seminar Series (SPSS) > The role of stigma in the pursuit of personal projects: Implications for the health and well-being of marginalized individuals

The role of stigma in the pursuit of personal projects: Implications for the health and well-being of marginalized individuals

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If you have a question about this talk, please contact Johanna M Lukate.

Tea and coffee are served before this seminar for attendees from 12.30pm onwards in the Nick Macintosh Seminar Room on the 2nd floor.

Over the last two decades, a growing body of research has established that experiences of stigma, prejudice, and discrimination can be detrimental to the health and well-being of marginalized individuals. However, the psychological mechanisms through which these “minority stressors” operate remain unclear. In this seminar, I will discuss research that suggests one way in which health and well-being are diminished by stigma is through the interruption and frustration of personal project pursuit in stigmatized life domains (e.g., relationship projects pursued by same-sex couples, academic projects pursued by Black students). I will conclude with a discussion of how the use of idiographic and constructivist approaches—such as personal projects analysis—has potential to integrate psychological, epidemiological, and sociological perspectives on the role that stigma plays in shaping the health and well-being of marginalized populations.

This talk is part of the Social Psychology Seminar Series (SPSS) series.

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