University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Social Psychology Seminar Series (SPSS) > The Order of Gendered Words in a Phrase: When and Why It Constitutes Gender-Biased Language

The Order of Gendered Words in a Phrase: When and Why It Constitutes Gender-Biased Language

Add to your list(s) Download to your calendar using vCal

If you have a question about this talk, please contact Johanna M Lukate.

Tea and coffee are served before this seminar for attendees from 12.30pm onwards in the Nick Macintosh Seminar Room on the 2nd floor.

I will present my work on the order of gendered words in conjoined phrases (e.g., “men and women”) as a form of gender-bias in language. I will argue that communicators put the more relevant party in the initial position, and audiences assign stronger relevance to the party in that position. Studies 1-3 document the prevalence of male-first conjoined phrases in the public (but not family) domain and link the pattern to historical changes in women’s public presence over the 20th century. Studies 4 and 5 show that people spontaneously produce stereotype-consistent word order patterns when relevance differences are not known or presumed. Studies 6 and 7 find that word order affects the perceived relevance of the two genders in a given context. Overall, this work provides a theoretical account and empirical evidence for word order in conjoined phrases as a form of gender-biased language.

This talk is part of the Social Psychology Seminar Series (SPSS) series.

Tell a friend about this talk:

This talk is included in these lists:

Note that ex-directory lists are not shown.

 

© 2006-2019 Talks.cam, University of Cambridge. Contact Us | Help and Documentation | Privacy and Publicity