University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Departmental Seminars in History and Philosophy of Science > Facing facts: the great Tichborne trials and the rise of modern visual evidence

Facing facts: the great Tichborne trials and the rise of modern visual evidence

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The paper investigates the role of photography and other forms of visual evidence and display in the celebrated 19th-century trials in Britain of the ‘Tichborne Claimant’. Familiar to historians as the longest legal proceedings of the Victorian age, a popular cause that attracted working-class support, the Tichborne trials (1871–1874) were also a landmark in the emergence of modern visual culture, concepts of evidence and new methods of historical narration. Analysis of some of the central images from the case frames a discussion of historical methodologies at the heart of current Victorian visual studies, history of science and technology, public history, legal studies and social and cultural history.

This talk is part of the Departmental Seminars in History and Philosophy of Science series.

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