University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Computer Laboratory Security Seminar > Opening locks by bumping in five seconds or less: is it really a threat to physical security?

Opening locks by bumping in five seconds or less: is it really a threat to physical security?

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Note change from originally publicized time

There are millions of pin tumbler locks in the world that provide the primary security for the consumer, business and government. The vast majority of these can be compromised in seconds with a minimal skill level and virtually no tools. The procedure is called “bumping” and was first developed in Denmark a quarter century ago, although the underlying theory of physics was in fact presented by Sir Isaac Newton over three centuries ago. Marc Weber Tobias presents an introduction to the technique of bumping and a detailed analysis of its real security threat.

This talk is part of the Computer Laboratory Security Seminar series.

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