University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Departmental Seminars in History and Philosophy of Science > A California Yankee in King Arthur's Court (with apologies to Mark Twain), or why a molecular neurobiologist landed in HPS

A California Yankee in King Arthur's Court (with apologies to Mark Twain), or why a molecular neurobiologist landed in HPS

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It is obvious that to study the history or philosophy of science, science itself must first exist. It is much less obvious to many, and especially to students, that to ‘do science’ optimally requires an equally deep grounding in the history and philosophy of science. What applies to students applies no less, and possibly even more, to professors in the natural sciences. In this seminar, I discuss the clinical and scientific history of Alzheimer’s disease, with special reference to controversies that have arisen from one of the most common and insidious errors of scientific practice, misassumption. Misassumptions will be exemplified through the consideration of a priori bias and inappropriate adherence to dogma. Examples of Kuhn-like paradigm shifts will be discussed. Concluding remarks will address the current state-of-the-art in Alzheimer’s disease research and offer suggestions for facilitating progress towards a cure.

This talk is part of the Departmental Seminars in History and Philosophy of Science series.

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