University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Computer Laboratory Digital Technology Group (DTG) Meetings > (Research) Nice detectors for ugly lattices / (Research) Bringing The Next Billion Online: Computing Research For Developing Regions

(Research) Nice detectors for ugly lattices / (Research) Bringing The Next Billion Online: Computing Research For Developing Regions

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Research: Nice detectors for ugly lattices, Francisco Monteiro

This talk shows that it is useful to approximate a given random lattice by one with a structure that allows a trellis representation and thus trellis decoding. The problem of finding a quasi-orthogonal sublattice in a lattice is central for the solution to the problem. That problem is known in theoretical computer science as the Quasi-Orthogonal Subset problem (QOS) but had never been thoroughly researched as it was thought a theoretical question lacking applications to real problems. The solution of this problem was investigated as it is the key to design efficient trellis-based receivers for MIMO communication systems.

Research: Bringing The Next Billion Online: Computing Research For Developing Regions, Ripduman Sohan

This talk introduces the idea of technological research for developing regions in three parts. I begin by outlining the case for this research and highlight the (interesting and different) challenges associated with carrying out technical research in developing countries. I then provide some (varied) examples of such work highlighting its impact. I conclude by outlining some immediate areas of interest that overlap with the DTG ’s areas of expertise.

This talk is part of the Computer Laboratory Digital Technology Group (DTG) Meetings series.

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