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RNA editing in plant organelles: Correlation between editing sites and protein three-dimensional structures

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Ectopic seminar - N.B. in Biochemistry Department

In plant organelles, specific messenger RNAs (mRNAs) are subjected to conversion editing, a process that often converts the first or second nucleotide of a codon and hence of the encoded amino acid. No systematic patterns in converted sites were found on mRNAs, and the converted sites rarely encoded residues located at the active sites of proteins. The role and origin of RNA editing in plant organelles remain to be elucidated. Here we study the relationship between amino acid residues encoded by edited codons and the structural characteristics of these residues within proteins. We find that the residues encoded by edited codons are significantly biased toward involvement in helices and protein structural cores. The puzzling point of the finding is that the editing occurs on mRNA and protein 3D structures cannot play roles in the editing processes. We propose the cause of the observed correlation based on the evolution of land plants.

This talk is part of the Computational and Systems Biology series.

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