University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Computer Laboratory Digital Technology Group (DTG) Meetings > (Skills) Writing technical reports and theses based in MS Word / (Research) Near real-time analysis of high speed video for sprinting

(Skills) Writing technical reports and theses based in MS Word / (Research) Near real-time analysis of high speed video for sprinting

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Skills: Writing technical reports and theses based in MS Word, Francisco Monteiro

What was supposed to be a user-friendly word processor gave at one time or another bad experiences to the users of MS Word or dislike of the printed outcome. The prevalent idea in some circles is still that a long document with figures, a table of contents and the looks of a professional work require other editing tools, in particular when the document contains many mathematical expressions. Did the MS solution progress in the mean time? This talk looks at what is possible to get from a solution based in MS Word, Visio and the Math Type add-on.

Research: Near real-time analysis of high speed video for sprinting, Robert Harle

High speed video has long been used in sports coaching scenarios. In most disciplines, however, there is not enough time to analyse the video for even the smallest technical point, before another repetition is to be performed. Analysis therefore tends to be offline, meaning feedback takes days rather than the seconds. I will talk about how, as part of the EPSRC SESAME grant, we are hoping to provide basic analysis (foot contact times, stride segmentation) within seconds of a sprinter completing a repetition. I will discuss the video analysis we use, the on-body sensors that have been tried, the results to date and the plans for the future.

This talk is part of the Computer Laboratory Digital Technology Group (DTG) Meetings series.

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