University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > British Antarctic Survey > Constraining the representation of the atmospheric hydrological cycle in General Circulation Models using water isotopes and what would be needed to directly compare ice core water isotope records with model simulations

Constraining the representation of the atmospheric hydrological cycle in General Circulation Models using water isotopes and what would be needed to directly compare ice core water isotope records with model simulations

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If you have a question about this talk, please contact Dr Maria Vittoria Guarino.

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Water isotopes in the atmospheric hydrological cycle as rain, snow and water vapor offers a direct proxy for the physical processes controlling the water cycle. This is due to the individual isotopes’ molecular structure, which offers a fingerprint of conditions during phase change, such as during evaporation from the ocean and condensation in the clouds. Water vapor isotopes can now be measured continuously in the atmosphere thanks to the advent of commercially available laser spectrometers. This has given an exciting possibility to benchmark the treatment of the hydrological cycle in General Circulation Models equipped with water isotopes. Furthermore, with the possibility to simulate the isotopes in the hydrological cycle we can also use General Circulation Models to interpret past variations in the hydrological cycle by combining simulations with ice core isotope records. In my seminar I will present the latest research on using water vapor isotopes to benchmark isotope-enabled General Circulation Models and the possibilities and challenges for merging ice core water isotope records with simulations using isotope-enabled General Circulation Models.

This talk is part of the British Antarctic Survey series.

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