University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Computer Laboratory Digital Technology Group (DTG) Meetings > (Research) Analogue Markers: A Marker Design Optimised to Represent Continuous Quantities / (Research) Optical motion capture using Nintendo Wii controllers

(Research) Analogue Markers: A Marker Design Optimised to Represent Continuous Quantities / (Research) Optical motion capture using Nintendo Wii controllers

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Research: Analogue Markers: A Marker Design Optimised to Represent Continuous Quantities, Tom Craig

Fiducial markers may be used to encode symbolic data such as URLs and keys into databases: the marker is divided into sectors, and typically each sector is black or white. In this talk, we propose a marker design that is optimised instead for representing continuous quantities such as floating-point data; it does this using a shape on the marker whose size or position is a function of the value it represents. We achieve the attractive property that the precision of readings increases monotonically with decreasing distance between camera and marker. We call our marker design an “analogue” design, in contrast to sector-based “digital” designs.

Research: Optical motion capture using Nintendo Wii controllers, Simon Hay

Optical motion capture systems triangulate the 3D position of a subject between cameras calibrated to provide overlapping views. Traditionally these systems have been bulky, expensive and immobile. This talk will outline a system that takes advantage of the infrared sensor built into Nintendo Wii controllers to provide active marker motion tracking at a fraction of the current cost and in a rugged, portable form factor.

This talk is part of the Computer Laboratory Digital Technology Group (DTG) Meetings series.

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