University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Cambridge University Linguistic Society (LingSoc) > I saw, I unsaw, I resaw: how we access and make use of unconscious knowledge about verbal roots

I saw, I unsaw, I resaw: how we access and make use of unconscious knowledge about verbal roots

Add to your list(s) Download to your calendar using vCal

If you have a question about this talk, please contact Jamie Douglas.

In this talk I’ll discuss a number of experiments investigating how we rapidly and accurately access information about the verbal roots of morphologically complex words like ‘saw’ or ‘jumped’, and morphologically complex pseudo words like ‘unthink’ and ‘redance’. The experiments range from simple button press experiments in which participants say whether they think strings like ‘ungrow’ are a possible word of English or not, through eye-movement studies in which words like ‘unthinkable’ occur in natural sentence context, to studies using MEG to investigate the millisecond by millisecond neural activation patterns involved in processing complex words. I’ll show that by focusing on the apparently simple question of how we detect and make use of information about verbal roots, we can gain significant insight into the overall architecture of the human linguistic system.

This talk is part of the Cambridge University Linguistic Society (LingSoc) series.

Tell a friend about this talk:

This talk is included in these lists:

Note that ex-directory lists are not shown.

 

© 2006-2021 Talks.cam, University of Cambridge. Contact Us | Help and Documentation | Privacy and Publicity