University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Trinity Mathematical Society > Do pharmacological interventions reduce drugs-related deaths? What statistical methods are there - and how can we use them to find out?

Do pharmacological interventions reduce drugs-related deaths? What statistical methods are there - and how can we use them to find out?

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Powerful well-designed randomized controlled trials together with intelligence gleaned from the clinical follow-up of research cohorts of HIV -infected patients have transformed the life expectancy of HIV -infected persons from less than 10 years in the 1980s to the loss of 10 years from life-expectancy in the 21st century. By contrast, Scotland lost more lives to opiate-related deaths in the five years from 2006-2010 than to HIV /AIDS in 30 years. Why? To what extent do pharmacological or criminal justice interventions reduce opiate-related deaths? How do we find out . . . ? Sheila describes discoveries in the heroin injectors’ story from 1980 to 2012, and how they were made.

This talk is part of the Trinity Mathematical Society series.

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