University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Pedagogy, Language, Arts & Culture in Education (PLACE) Group Seminars > Positive psychology and positive education: Old wine in new bottles?

Positive psychology and positive education: Old wine in new bottles?

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If you have a question about this talk, please contact Ewa Illakowicz.

Please contact Ewa Illakowicz (ei219@cam.ac.uk) if you are planning to attend

The recently fashionable theories of positive psychology have educational ramifications at virtually every level of engagement, culminating in the model of ‘positive education’. In this critical review, I scrutinize positive education as a potential theory in educational psychology. Special attention is given to conceptual controversies and suggested educational interventions. Positive psychologists have yet to explore in detail the school as a positive institution. They have written at length, however, about such positive personal traits as moral virtue and resiliency, and about positive emotions both as embodied in experiences of classroom ‘flow’ and as facilitators of students’ personal resources. Because the empirical evidence concerning these positive factors remains partly mixed or tentative, and because most of them had a home in other theoretical frameworks before the advent of positive psychology, searching questions remain about the effectiveness and originality of positive education. I address some of those questions.

Forthcoming dates for philosophical approaches to education seminar series:

10th May, Professor Peter Roberts, ‘The Gentle Art of Teaching: Camus, Taoism and Education’, 17:00-18:30

17th May, Professor Peter Roberts, ‘Possible Dreams: Paulo Freire and Utopian Education’, 17:00-18:30

This talk is part of the Pedagogy, Language, Arts & Culture in Education (PLACE) Group Seminars series.

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