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Network Strategies of Small Chinese High-Technology Firms: A Qualitative Study

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Prof. Wai-sum Siu will share his qualitative research into the entrepreneurial network of small Chinese high-technology firms. A tentative schema is proposed, illustrating four types of entrepreneurial networkers according to network adaptation and external resource dependence. Network adaptation is based on the differentiation of the entrepreneurial efforts in network construction and change: integrative adaptation, cooperation, and coordination. External resource dependence indicates to what extent the entrepreneur relies on external resources-that is, placing emphasis on using external resources or maintaining a balance between internal and external resources. The reliance on external resources is highly related to two factors: the nature of relationship and the extent of commitment. In a transaction-based, relationship-dominated network, if the entrepreneur decides to develop his or her own resource competitiveness he or she will rely less on external resources. In a collaboration-based, relationship-dominated network, if the entrepreneur tends to have a low commitment to maintaining the relationship, he or she will depend little on external resources. Customer-oriented networkers value interpersonal relations and strive to establish long-term customer relationships. Partnership networkers form strategic alliance with suppliers, manufacturers, and subcontractors to access external resources. Value-oriented networkers have a holistic view of networks and play an active role in network construction and development. Prospecting networkers make a strong commitment to network actors to exploit external resources and to make proactive moves to adapt to environmental changes.

This talk is part of the Manufacturing Research Forum series.

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