University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Seminars for the Centre for Environmental and Industrial Flows > David Madden - DFT Studies on the Reactivity of Iron Surfaces: Searching for Novel Routes to Passivation and Anke Krautsieder - Preparation and testing of novel materials for steel surface maintenance procedures

David Madden - DFT Studies on the Reactivity of Iron Surfaces: Searching for Novel Routes to Passivation and Anke Krautsieder - Preparation and testing of novel materials for steel surface maintenance procedures

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David Madden DFT Studies on the Reactivity of Iron Surfaces: Searching for Novel Routes to Passivation

The process for repainting steel structures in marine environments involves an initial abrasive blasting step, with the application of the new coating several hours later. Recent work has highlighted the importance of protecting the steel from corrosion immediately, to maximise the lifetime of the subsequently applied coating. In this talk, I discuss density-functional theory (DFT) calculations aimed at assessing whether the highly reactive surface, briefly exposed on abrading, can be used to generate a thin layer of adsorbed species, which then imparts protection: the strength of bonding to the surface and reaction pathways of isolated adsorbed species will be discussed, as will changes to the electronic structure of the underlying surface and the behaviour at higher adsorbate coverages.

Anke Krautsieder Preparation and testing of novel materials for steel surface maintenance procedures

Abrasive blasting of steel using almandine garnet is a common on-site surface cleaning procedure prior to applying protective coatings. A certain percentage of almandine garnet and impurities are embedded in or attached to the steel due to their relative material hardness, leading to partial surface coverage. These residues can affect the coating adhesion and performance. Investigation of novel materials for widely used abrasive blasting technologies promises straightforward, low-cost solutions. The implementation of microcapsules in the abrasive material enables transport of encapsulated surface-active reagents directly to the steel and could significantly improve the longevity of protective paints.

This talk is part of the Seminars for the Centre for Environmental and Industrial Flows series.

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