University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Cambridge University Astronomical Society (CUAS) > ‘How to make a bigger supernova’ and ‘Optical interferometry: Because sometimes a 40-meter telescope just isn’t big enough’.

‘How to make a bigger supernova’ and ‘Optical interferometry: Because sometimes a 40-meter telescope just isn’t big enough’.

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Dan Mortimer: ‘Optical interferometry: Because sometimes a 40-meter telescope just isn’t big enough’ Optical interferometry is a powerful tool which, by physically combining the light from separate telescopes, allows for unprecedented levels of spatial resolution to be reached. This allows for observations only possible by optical interferometry such as imaging the inner few astronomical units of forming stars or the surface of other stars themselves. In this talk I will give an overview of what optical interferometry is and how it works before going on to discuss the innovations of the MROI , a new generation optical interferometer under construction in New Mexico.

Andrew Sellek: ‘How To Make A Bigger Supernova’ Supernovae are very effective at disrupting the galaxy around them, which is important for star formation and galaxy evolution. I’ll discuss how supernovae blasts grow with time and how cosmic rays affect this.

The talks will be followed by refreshments outside the lecture theatre and then a trip to the pub. The talks will be at 7:30pm at the usual location of Wolfson lecture theatre in the Department of Chemistry. The entrance is the opposite side of the building to Bristol-Myers-Squibb Lecture theatre and is opposite the car park- shown by the red arrow on the map. https://map.cam.ac.uk/Department+of+Chemistry#52.197964,0.125242,18 More information on the talk can be found on our Facebook event https://www.facebook.com/events/1953323328079962/ Tickets are £2 (free for members) and annual membership (£7) and life membership (£12) can also be purchased at the event – please bring cash.

This talk is part of the Cambridge University Astronomical Society (CUAS) series.

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