University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Quantitative History Seminar > The labor market consequences of electricity adoption: concrete evidence from the Great Depression

The labor market consequences of electricity adoption: concrete evidence from the Great Depression

Add to your list(s) Download to your calendar using vCal

If you have a question about this talk, please contact sja60.

It remains a puzzle that job creation was so low during the Great Depression despite the quick recovery of productivity. This paper tests whether the adoption of electricity can explain both facts. It uses geography as an instrument for the change in the price of electricity and the concrete industry as a detailed case study. It finds that cheaper electricity caused a decrease in employment and in the labor share of income, as well as an increase in labor quantity productivity and electrical intensity. The findings lend support to the theory of technological unemployment during the Great Depression.

This talk is part of the Quantitative History Seminar series.

Tell a friend about this talk:

This talk is included in these lists:

Note that ex-directory lists are not shown.

 

© 2006-2019 Talks.cam, University of Cambridge. Contact Us | Help and Documentation | Privacy and Publicity