University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Violence and Conflict Graduate Workshop, Faculty of History > Gunpowder, treason and plot: policing political violence in Constantinople and Alexandria, 1918-1923

Gunpowder, treason and plot: policing political violence in Constantinople and Alexandria, 1918-1923

Add to your list(s) Download to your calendar using vCal

If you have a question about this talk, please contact Gui Xi Young.

The cities of Alexandria and Istanbul seemed to present British military authorities with a tangle of insidious plots against the lives of their personnel, while a perceptibly bloodthirsty populace were feared to be on the brink of indiscriminate mutual massacre. The paper explores how such premonitions of violence, fed by burgeoning intelligence capabilities and colonial paranoia, became the centrepieces of discourses legitimating increasingly intrusive military rule. Consequent legislative measures and counter-subversive operations established a regime of coercive violence that undermined diplomatic efforts to cast British occupation as a system of Anglo-Egyptian or Anglo-Turkish cooperation in each case, resulting in confrontation and retreat. The institutional architecture of repression, however, remained largely in tact, and was passed on to new national regimes with the eventual blessing of its previous occupants, creating an enduring legacy of militarised jurisdiction and policing that would be echoed in later waves of decolonisation.

This talk is part of the Violence and Conflict Graduate Workshop, Faculty of History series.

Tell a friend about this talk:

This talk is included in these lists:

Note that ex-directory lists are not shown.

 

© 2006-2021 Talks.cam, University of Cambridge. Contact Us | Help and Documentation | Privacy and Publicity