University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Archaeology Graduate Seminar Series > The residential area F/I in Tell el-Dab'a/Avaris (Egypt) - Multicultural life in a town of the Second Intermediate Period

The residential area F/I in Tell el-Dab'a/Avaris (Egypt) - Multicultural life in a town of the Second Intermediate Period

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Since more than 40 years the Austrian Archaeological Institute is digging in Tell el-Dab’a in the eastern Nile Delta. The place could be identified with ancient Avaris, the capital of the Hyksos, a dynasty of foreign rulers over Egypt in the end of the Second Intermediate Period (1650-1540BC). Coming from the region of the Levant, Syria and Palestine these foreign rulers always remained as a trauma in the Egyptian memory but presented however a unique combination of foreign traditions assimilated to the Egyptian culture. My research is focused on the residential area F/I (local labelling). In addition to temples, palaces, cemeteries and the big harbours of the city this quarter presents a development of around 150 years and a gradual improvement of the living standards which can possibly be paralleled with the rise of this foreign population leading to their takeover of power. Apart from political implications this quarter delivers insight in the everyday life of one of the largest cities of this period. In collecting all the different information concerning the analysis of the bones, plant remains, pottery and small finds and combining them with the architecture I try to reconstruct a close picture of the ancient living conditions and contribute another comprehensive study to Egyptian settlement archaeology.

This talk is part of the Archaeology Graduate Seminar Series series.

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