University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Lennard-Jones Centre > A touch of non-linearity: mesoscale swimmers and active matter in fluids

A touch of non-linearity: mesoscale swimmers and active matter in fluids

Add to your list(s) Download to your calendar using vCal

  • UserProf. Daphne Klotsa, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • ClockMonday 20 June 2022, 14:00-14:30
  • HouseVenue to be confirmed.

If you have a question about this talk, please contact Jerelle Joseph.

Living matter, such as biological tissue, can be seen as a nonequilibrium hierarchical assembly of assemblies of smaller and smaller active components, where energy is consumed at many scales. The functionality and versatility of such living or “active-matter” systems render it a promising candidate to study and to synthetically design. While many active-matter systems reside in fluids (solution, blood, ocean, air), so far, studies that include hydrodynamic interactions have focussed on microscopic scales in Stokes flows, where the active particles are less than 100μm and the Reynolds number, Re much less than 1. At those microscopic scales viscosity dominates and inertia can be neglected. However, what happens as swimmers slightly increase in size (say ~0.1mm-100cm) or as they form larger aggregates and swarms? The system then enters the intermediate Reynolds regime where both inertia and viscosity play a role, and where nonlinearities in the fluid are introduced. In this talk, I will present my group’s work on simple model swimmers we use to understand the transition from Stokes to intermediate Reynolds numbers, first for a single swimmer, then for pairwise interactions and finally for collective behavior. We show that, even for simple models, inertia can induce hydrodynamic interactions that generate novel phase behavior, steady states and transitions.

This talk is part of the Lennard-Jones Centre series.

Tell a friend about this talk:

This talk is included in these lists:

Note that ex-directory lists are not shown.

 

© 2006-2022 Talks.cam, University of Cambridge. Contact Us | Help and Documentation | Privacy and Publicity