University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Engineering Department Bio- and Micromechanics Seminars > Mechanics of Architected Materials Across Length and Time Scales

Mechanics of Architected Materials Across Length and Time Scales

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  • UserProf Carlos M Portela, School of Engineering, MIT
  • ClockFriday 25 February 2022, 14:00-15:00
  • HouseZoom.

If you have a question about this talk, please contact Hilde Hambro.

Architected materials have been ubiquitous in nature, enabling unique properties that are unachievable by monolithic, homogeneous materials. Inspired by natural processes, human-made three-dimensional (3D) architected materials have been reported to enable novel mechanical properties such as high stiffness-to-density ratios or extreme resilience, increasingly so when nanoscale size effects are present. However, most architected materials have relied on advanced additive manufacturing techniques that are not yet scalable and yield small sample sizes. Additionally, most of these nano- and micro-architected materials have only been studied in the static regime, leaving the dynamic parameter space unexplored. In this talk, we discuss advances in our understanding of architected materials by: (i) proposing numerical and theoretical tools that predict the behavior of architected materials with non-ideal geometries, (ii) presenting a pathway for scalable fabrication of tunable nano-architected materials, and (iii) exploring the response of nano- and micro-architected materials under three types of dynamic loading. We first explore the mechanics of lattice architectures with features at the micro- and millimeter scales, and discuss the effect of nodes (i.e., junctions) to obtain more accurate computational and theoretical predictive tools. Going beyond lattices, we propose alternative node-less geometries that exhibit extreme mechanical resilience, and we harness self-assembly processes to demonstrate a pathway to fabricate one type in cubic-centimeter volumes while maintaining nanoscale features. Lastly, we venture into the dynamic regime by designing, fabricating, and testing micro-architected materials that exhibit vibrational band gaps in the MHz regime as well as nano-architected materials with extreme energy absorption upon microparticle supersonic impact.

This talk is part of the Engineering Department Bio- and Micromechanics Seminars series.

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