University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > The Cambridge Group for the History of Population and Social Structure - seminar series > Plagues and Peoples revisited: new insights into historical patterns of infectious disease transmission, impact and control

Plagues and Peoples revisited: new insights into historical patterns of infectious disease transmission, impact and control

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Cambridge, 23rd – 24th March 2020

William McNeill’s book Plagues and peoples (1975) was enormously influential in persuading historians of the importance of infectious diseases in human history. McNeill offered a radical interpretation of the consequences of globalisation, colonisation and urbanisation for the spread of micro- and macro-parasites, and emphasised the importance of host-parasite accommodation and co-evolution to historical processes of population growth and conflict. This workshop seeks to re-evaluate McNeill’s elegant models of host-pathogen interactions in the light of new developments in archaeology, evolutionary biology and historical research. It brings together archaeologists, demographers, epidemiologists, evolutionary biologists, geographers, historians and mathematicians to provide cutting-edge interdisciplinary perspectives on historical disease patterns, and to discuss new collaborative approaches to the history of infectious diseases.

The workshop is free to attend but BOOKING IS REQUIRED . Registration and a draft programme are available at https://www.campop.geog.cam.ac.uk/events/plaguesandpeoples/

This talk is part of the The Cambridge Group for the History of Population and Social Structure - seminar series series.

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