University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Darwin College Humanities and Social Sciences Group > Child Kingship from a Comparative Perspective: Boy Kings in England, Scotland, France, and Germany, 1050-1250

Child Kingship from a Comparative Perspective: Boy Kings in England, Scotland, France, and Germany, 1050-1250

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If you have a question about this talk, please contact Dr Arthur Dudney.

Children succeeded to the thrones of medieval kingdoms with remarkable frequency, in spite of the many social, political, legal, and even biblical impediments to underage (‘minority’) rulership. Examining child kingship from a comparative perspective reveals wider developments over the eleventh, twelfth, and thirteenth centuries which influenced a boy king’s succession, and the arrangements made for his care and the rule of his kingdom. This talk will focus on changing perceptions of age and maturity which altered the rites of passage between childhood and adulthood. Understanding how these developments affected even kings suggests interesting avenues of future research into adolescence and youth in the Middle Ages.

This talk is part of the Darwin College Humanities and Social Sciences Group series.

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