University of Cambridge > Talks.cam > Plant Sciences Departmental Seminars > Phenotypic changes induced by stress and developmental reprogramming in plants Plant host-pathogen coevolution and exploring local adaptation of an Arabidopsis thaliana complex Resistance gene locus

Phenotypic changes induced by stress and developmental reprogramming in plants Plant host-pathogen coevolution and exploring local adaptation of an Arabidopsis thaliana complex Resistance gene locus

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Mechanisms of surveillance by plants and counter-surveillance by microbes provide a fascinating framework for deciphering host-pathogen coevolution and identifying robust and vulnerable disease resistance nodes. We’re studying plant host recognition of biotrophic pathogens and the processes by which intracellular (NLR) innate immunity receptors, sensing pathogen interference with host cells, transmit recognition to anti-microbial defence pathways. Using Arabidopsis thaliana as our model host system we’ve been examining NLR homeostasis and activation, and identifying which NLR -induced transcriptional ‘sectors’ contribute to stopping pathogen growth. We’re then positioning these immunity branches within the broader environmental stress response network. I’ll describe some recent results and ideas on how plant innate immunity systems manage to be resilient against rapidly evolving microbial pathogens. I’ll also describe our analysis of a functionally interesting NLR receptor ‘Resistance’ gene cluster in a natural Arabidopsis thaliana population. From this study, we hope to gain insights to the evolutionary and ecological forces underlying plant immune receptor maintenance in nature.

This talk is part of the Plant Sciences Departmental Seminars series.

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